Posted in commentary, latest posts, Sports

Baby Come Back Podcast Wrap Up

Back Talk returned with special guest Robyn Mundy of The Bills Wire for a post script on Super Bowl LI and how the Atlanta Falcons choked away an epic lead on their way to losing to the New England Patriots in overtime. Then, we gave you an update on the Buffalo Bills and whether Tyrod Taylor should quarterback the Bills in 2017. Finally, we took on the topic of Pro Football Hall of Fame voting and the controversy over wide receiver Terrell Owens.

In our first segment, we discussed how the Falcons earned the title “most epic choke job in sports history” Sunday night giving up a 25 point lead in the second half on the way to a Patriots win in overtime. It was weird watching the Falcons act like they didn’t have the biggest lead in Super Bowl history. From colossal clock mismanagement to their failure to run the ball to unfortunate penalties, the Falcons completed the trifecta of failure and only have themselves to blame for their loss.

Next, we looked at the state of the Buffalo Bills and what went wrong in the short lived Rex Ryan era. The Tyrod Taylor question looms large over the franchise. Good quarterbacks don’t grow on trees. Will they or should they let Taylor walk? We also discussed whether general manager Doug Whaley is on the hot seat.

In our final segment,  we looked at the Pro Football Hall of Fame vote and the exclusion of wide receiver Terrell Owens from the nominees. In his second year of eligibility, he didn’t even make the first vote cut down to ten. The diva wide receiver famously was a disruptive figure on many of his stops in the National Football League yet his numbers are irrefutable.

Owens made the rounds because he was disruptive on occasions on the sidelines and in the locker room. However, he was also disruptive on the field and the numbers speak volumes. Simply put, he was one of the best. It is past time he made it into Canton.

You can listen to today’s podcast here.

Posted in commentary, latest posts, Sports

Can You Hear Me? Podcast Wrap Up

“Never be afraid to raise your voice for honesty and truth and compassion against injustice and lying and greed. If people all over the world…would do this, it would change the earth.”
William Faulkner

We live in crazy times and there is not nearly enough time in a one hour podcast to touch upon it all. So let’s focus on what matters first. White supremacists run the White House and they are trying to tell you that protest against their unconstitutional and illegal actions is bad. DO. NOT. LISTEN. PROTEST. IS. AS. AMERICAN. AS. IT. GETS.

I repeat protest is as American as apple pie and this nation was founded upon it. In light of today’s climate, let’s revisit one of our nation’s most famous protests shall we?  #NeverForget

Mary Ann Vecchio screams as she kneels over the body of fellow student Jeffrey Miller during an anti-war demonstration at Kent State University, Ohio, May 4, 1970. Four students were killed when Ohio National Guard troops fired at some 600 anti-war demonstrators. A cropped version of this image won the Pulitzer Prize.
Mary Ann Vecchio screams as she kneels over the body of fellow student Jeffrey Miller during an anti-war demonstration at Kent State University, Ohio, May 4, 1970. Four students were killed when Ohio National Guard troops fired at some 600 anti-war demonstrators. A cropped version of this image won the Pulitzer Prize.

On May 4, 1970 four young Kent State students were killed when the Ohio National Guard fired at unarmed protesters during an anti-war protest against our involvement in Vietnam. This event is referred to in our history books as the Kent State Massacre. The Kent State protest, one of the largest in our country, is widely credited with putting an end to the Vietnam War and ultimately helped seal the end Richard Nixon’s presidency. Watergate did quite a bit to help too of course. 

The National Guard fire tear gas to disperse the crowd of students gathered on the commons, May 4, 1970.
The National Guard fire tear gas to disperse the crowd of students gathered on the commons, May 4, 1970.

Protest isn’t inherently violent and far too often they end up that way because of those who object to the message of the protest. Police brutality versus civil rights activists has been well documented and if you aren’t familiar you should read up on it. Suppression of the people by any means necessary goes hand in hand with authoritarianism. We must never cede our right as citizens and watch dogs of federal overreach to protest against injustice.

“Nothing strengthens authority so much as silence.”
Leonardo da Vinci

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