Posted in commentary, latest posts, Sports

Can You Hear Me? Podcast Wrap Up

“Never be afraid to raise your voice for honesty and truth and compassion against injustice and lying and greed. If people all over the world…would do this, it would change the earth.”
William Faulkner

We live in crazy times and there is not nearly enough time in a one hour podcast to touch upon it all. So let’s focus on what matters first. White supremacists run the White House and they are trying to tell you that protest against their unconstitutional and illegal actions is bad. DO. NOT. LISTEN. PROTEST. IS. AS. AMERICAN. AS. IT. GETS.

I repeat protest is as American as apple pie and this nation was founded upon it. In light of today’s climate, let’s revisit one of our nation’s most famous protests shall we?  #NeverForget

Mary Ann Vecchio screams as she kneels over the body of fellow student Jeffrey Miller during an anti-war demonstration at Kent State University, Ohio, May 4, 1970. Four students were killed when Ohio National Guard troops fired at some 600 anti-war demonstrators. A cropped version of this image won the Pulitzer Prize.
Mary Ann Vecchio screams as she kneels over the body of fellow student Jeffrey Miller during an anti-war demonstration at Kent State University, Ohio, May 4, 1970. Four students were killed when Ohio National Guard troops fired at some 600 anti-war demonstrators. A cropped version of this image won the Pulitzer Prize.

On May 4, 1970 four young Kent State students were killed when the Ohio National Guard fired at unarmed protesters during an anti-war protest against our involvement in Vietnam. This event is referred to in our history books as the Kent State Massacre. The Kent State protest, one of the largest in our country, is widely credited with putting an end to the Vietnam War and ultimately helped seal the end Richard Nixon’s presidency. Watergate did quite a bit to help too of course. 

The National Guard fire tear gas to disperse the crowd of students gathered on the commons, May 4, 1970.
The National Guard fire tear gas to disperse the crowd of students gathered on the commons, May 4, 1970.

Protest isn’t inherently violent and far too often they end up that way because of those who object to the message of the protest. Police brutality versus civil rights activists has been well documented and if you aren’t familiar you should read up on it. Suppression of the people by any means necessary goes hand in hand with authoritarianism. We must never cede our right as citizens and watch dogs of federal overreach to protest against injustice.

“Nothing strengthens authority so much as silence.”
Leonardo da Vinci

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Posted in commentary, latest posts

On Protest and White Privilege

First they came for the Socialists, and I did not speak out—
Because I was not a Socialist.

Then they came for the Trade Unionists, and I did not speak out—
Because I was not a Trade Unionist.

Then they came for the Jews, and I did not speak out—
Because I was not a Jew.

Then they came for me—and there was no one left to speak for me. ~ Martin Niemöller

We’re going to be talking about protest and white privilege in light of recent events and a good place to start is always a bit of a tweetstorm. This is from last night.

Posted in commentary, latest posts, Sports

Ring The Bell Podcast Wrap Up

Happy Friday! Thanks to Justin Twell (@JustinTwell78) for the segment we did for Wednesday’s show with Week 3 picks, Minnesota Vikings, Green Bay Packers and more. Be sure to check out Inside The Pylon  and read his great work there. You can find my own work there too including my latest DFS Diary.

In today’s show we asked whether we will let Cam Newton live already? Newton is a grown man who should be allowed to determine what’s best for him and his family. Not everyone wants to protest or be an advocate and that is okay.

We all come to enlightenment in our own way and in our own space. Colin Kaepernick, who jump started this valuable conversation in our country, came to his own personal advocacy in his own time. Not everyone changes the world in a big way. Sometimes, its the small steps that make all the difference.

We can all be better friends, better neighbors, and better co-workers. In our own interpersonal communications we can change a life and maybe, just maybe, change our own little worlds. They say all politics is local and change most frequently occurs in small minute levels.

Let’s be that change.
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